Amazing Grace

Amazing Grace PosterAmazing Grace is the story of British abolitionist William Wilberforce and his struggle to end slavery in Great Brittan. The film follows him through his struggles and joys as he fights what appears a first to be a losing battle, but in the end, wins.

 

The Good

The overall message of the film is about fighting for something bigger and more important than ourselves. At the beginning of the film, Wilberforce is striving to be a politician, but his friends are all trying to get him to take on the issue of slavery. After becoming a Christian, Wilberforce does tackle the issue, and continues to fight for the abolition of slavery year after year, through defeat after defeat. The film is an excellent example of persevering through seeming overwhelming odds to, in the end, achieve a noble victory.

Also, I think it is worth noting that technically speaking, this film was excellent. The amount of detail taken in choosing and decorating the sets was incredible! While BBC didn’t (to my knowledge) have anything to do with this film, I came away with the same sort of feeling I get after watching one of their more recent films – “Wow, why haven’t we independent Christian filmmakers done so well?”

 

The Bad

There wasn’t a whole lot in the film that was offensive. John Newton was not portrayed very accurately (though besides that, the film was surprisingly historically accurate), and there where several instances of language, and a few scenes which included a low cut dress or two, but that was about all.

There are however, some scenes which would only be appropriate for mature audiences. The evils of the slave trade are discussed several times, and the characters use some rather vivid descriptions, which, while not inappropriate, are probably not suitable for young ears.

 

Conclusion

I enjoyed this film, and would probably recommend it to mature audiences who where aware of the few problems this film contains. It is an excellent example of perseverance.

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